AR/VR in Music

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Many artists are now just filters and effects that are linked to social media integration, for example in 2016, Ingrid Michaelson used snapchat to capture her video “Hell no,” when asked why, she responded: “In this age where everybody is trying to make themselves look thinner, or change the color of their eyes, or make their lips bigger with all these apps on your phone, I think it’s refreshing that Snapchat has ones that turn you into a chipmunk or a panda or an oddly shaped person” (Stern, 2016).

Fast-forward to 2018, Maroon 5 released their new single called “Wait.” The entire music video was shot using the snapchat app. Lead singer Adam Levine used more or less every snapchat filter available, from rabbit ears, rocking giant glasses and sporting a dog face. Plus the singer’s wife makes a brief appearance in the video. Although the video was not the bands typical approach for a video release, it certainly catered to the tween fans. Is this a strategy to stay relevant in the current market from a band that have been around since 2001?

So if this is a way for a band to stay current in 2018, how will this change live music? With people already basically watching the concert through their smart phones anyway, Eminem utilised this idea in his last concert at Coachella. The AR app allowed the audience to see the performance through a new light, there were helicopters, meat clever attacks and bomb blasts from the dropping. While holding the phone fans were able to experience the VR affects via the AR app at Coachella. “We figured if the phones are going to be there [at concerts] and people are going to be putting them up in the air and looking at them anyway why don’t we provide a way to maybe change the way they’re perceiving the show”, said Rosenberg (Shieber, 2018).

Interesting change in technology, but what does this mean for the music industry? Will everything be watched through a screen now? Is live music even considered live if it is watched through a screen, who knows?

Shieber, 2018

Stern, 2016

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